would
Old English wolde, past tense and past subjunctive of willan "to will" (see will (v.)). Would-be (adj.) "wishing to be, vainly pretending" is first recorded c.1300....
wroth (adj.)
Old English wra "angry" (literally "tormented, twisted"), from Proto-Germanic *wraith- (cognates: Old Frisian wreth "evil," Old Saxon wred, Middle Dutch wret, Dutch wreed "cruel," Old High German reid, Old Norse reir "angry, offended"), from...
wend (v.)
"to proceed on," Old English wendan "to turn, direct, go; convert, translate," from Proto-Germanic *wanjan (cognates: Old Saxon wendian, Old Norse venda, Swedish vnda, Old Frisian wenda, Dutch wenden, German wenden, Gothic wandjan "to turn")...
axon (n.)
"axis of the vertebrate body," 1842, from Greek axon "axis" (see axis)....
azure (n.)
early 14c., from Old French azur, asur, a color name, from a false separation of Arabic (al)-lazaward "lapis lazuli," as though the -l- were the French article l'. The Arabic name is from Persian lajward, from Lajward, a place in Turkestan,...
【白话词源OK】
OK的来源有几种说法,这里只介绍相对可信的一种。OK一词首次出现在1839年3月23日的《波士顿晨邮报》上。它作为一个笑话的一部分受到巨大关注。OK是常用词all correct(完全正确)的错...
Zwinglian(adj.)
该词用来形容瑞士神学者乌利齐.茨温利(Ulrich Zwinglian,1484-1531)的教义,尤其是他区别于路德(Luther)的对圣餐纯象征意义的理解。 茨温利于1506年被授以圣职成为牧师,并于1519年在苏黎世成...
wind
"air in motion," Old English wind "wind," from Proto-Germanic *windaz (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch, Dutch wind, Old Norse vindr, Old High German wind, German Wind, Gothic winds), from PIE *we-nt-o- "blowing," from root *we...
worth
Old English weor "significant, valuable, of value; valued, appreciated, highly thought-of, deserving, meriting; honorable, noble, of high rank; suitable for, proper, fit, capable," from Proto-Germanic *werthaz "toward, opposite," hence "equi...
wrong
late Old English, "twisted, crooked, wry," from Old Norse rangr, earlier *wrangr "crooked, wry, wrong," from Proto-Germanic *wrang- (cognates: Danish vrang "crooked, wrong," Middle Dutch wranc, Dutch wrang "sour, bitter," literally "that whi...
in't
archaic; 17c. as short for in it....
intimate
1630s, "closely acquainted, very familiar," from Late Latin intimatus, past participle of intimare "make known, announce, impress," from Latin intimus "inmost" (adj.), "close friend" (n.), superlative of in "in" (see in- (2)). Used euphemist...
invalid
"not strong, infirm," 1640s, from Latin invalidus "not strong, infirm, weak, feeble," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + validus "strong" (see valid). Specific meaning "infirm from sickness, disease, or injury" is from 1640s....
won't
contraction of will not, first recorded mid-15c. as wynnot, later wonnot (1580s) before the modern form emerged 1660s. See will....
violon d'Ingres (n.)
"an occasional pastime, an activity other than that for which one is well-known, or at which one excells," 1963, from French, literally "Ingres' violin," from the story that the great painter prefered to play his violin (badly) for visitors...
trompe l'oeil
1889, French, literally "deceives the eye," from tromper "to deceive," a verb of uncertain origin and the subject of many theories (see trump (v.2))....
tam-o'-shanter (n.)
c.1840, type of bonnet formerly worn by Scottish plowmen, from Tam O'Shanter "Tom of Shanter," name of hero in a poem of the same name by Robert Burns, written 1790. The woolen cap became fashionable for ladies c.1887....
ta'en
contraction of taken....
table-d'hote (n.)
"common table for guests at a hotel," French, table-d'hte, literally "table of the host;" see table (n.) + host (n.)....
shan't
by 1660s, "colloquial" [OED] contraction of shall not....
Shafi'i (n.)
member of one of the four principal schools of Sunni Muslims, 1704, from Arabic, from ash-Shafi'i, cognomen of founder Abu Abdallah Muhammad ibn Idris (767-819). Related: Shafi'ite....
s'mores
snack treat, 1937, from childish contraction of some more, as in "I'd like some more of those." S'more as a contraction is recorded by 1887....
raison d'etat (n.)
from French raison d'tat "reason of state," thus "convenience of the government."...
raison d'etre (n.)
"excuse for being," 1864, first recorded in letter of J.S. Mill, from French raison d'tre, literally "rational grounds for existence."...
Olbers'paradox
"if stars are uniformly distributed through the sky, their number should counterbalance their faintness and the night sky should be as bright as the day;" named for German astronomer H.W.M. Olbers (1758-1840), who propounded it in 1826....
o'clock (adj.)
c.1720, abbreviation of of the clock (1640s), from Middle English of the clokke (late 14c.). Use of clock hand positions to describe vector directions or angles is from late 18c....
o'er
poetic contraction of over....
O'
as a prefix in Irish names, from Irish , ua (Old Irish au) "descendant."...
ne'er-do-well (n.)
"one who is good for nothing," 1737, Scottish and northern English dialect, from contraction of phrase never do well. The adjective is first recorded 1773....
ne'er
c.1200, contraction of never....
mustn't
by mid-18c., contraction of must not; see must (v)....
Mothers'Day
the spelling used in the U.S. congressional resolution first recognizing it, May 9, 1908....
maitre d'hotel
1530s, "head domestic," from French matre d'htel, literally "house-master," from Old French maistre "master; skilled worker, educator" (12c.), from Latin magistrum (see magistrate). Sense of "hotel manager, manager of a dining room" is from...
maitre d'
also maitre d, 1943; see matre d'htel....
magic
late 14c., "art of influencing events and producing marvels using hidden natural forces," from Old French magique "magic, magical," from Late Latin magice "sorcery, magic," from Greek magike (presumably with tekhne "art"), fem. of magikos "m...
mace
"heavy metal weapon, often with a spiked head," late 13c., from Old French mace "a club, scepter" (Modern French masse), from Vulgar Latin *mattea (source also of Italian mazza, Spanish maza "mace"), from Latin mateola (in Late Latin also ma...
ma'am
also maam, 1660s, colloquial shortening of madam (q.v.). At one time the ordinary respectful form of address to a married woman; later restricted to the queen and royal princesses or used by servants to their mistresses....
Jack o'lantern (n.)
also jack-o-lantern, 1660s, a local name for a will-o-the-wisp (Latin ignis fatuus), mainly attested in East Anglia but also in southwestern England. The extension to carved pumpkins is attested by 1834, American English....
j'accuse
French, literally "I accuse," phrase made famous by Emile Zola in a public letter attacking the irregularities of the Dreyfus trial (published Jan. 13, 1898)....
I've
contraction of I have, 1742, first attested in Richardson's "Pamela."...
i'nt
also i'n't, 18c., contraction representing a casual pronunciation of isn't it....
hors d'oeuvre
1714, as an adverb, "out of the ordinary," from French hors d'oeuvre, "outside the ordinary courses (of a meal)," literally "apart from the main work," from hors, variant of fors "outside" (from Latin foris; see foreign) + de "from" + oeuvre...
high-falutin'
also highfalutin, 1848, U.S. slang, possibly from high-flying, or flown, or even flute....
hadn't
by 1705, contraction of had not....
Graves' disease
1868, named for Irish physician Robert James Graves (1796-1853), who first recognized the disease in 1835....
fox
Old English fox, from Proto-Germanic *fukhs (cognates Old Saxon vohs, Middle Dutch and Dutch vos, Old High German fuhs, German Fuchs, Old Norse foa, Gothic fauho), from Proto-Germanic base *fuh-, corresponding to PIE *puk- "tail" (source als...
e'er
variant spelling of ever, now archaic or poetic....
e'en
variant spelling of even, now archaic or poetic. E'enamost "even almost" is recorded from 1735 in Kentish speech....
Zoroastrianism
n. 拜火教 拆分:Zoroastrian + -ism . 拜火教是在伊斯兰教出现之前的波斯宗教,公元前6世纪由琐罗亚斯德(Zoroaster,阿维斯陀语中写作Zarathustra;约公元前600-前583)创立。琐罗亚斯德30岁左右在幻...
zeppelin (n.)
这个单词尤其指德国在20世纪早期建造的硬式圆柱形飞艇。其名字来自德国将军及航空先驱费迪南德.冯.齐柏林伯爵(Count Ferdinand von Zeppeli,1838-1917)。齐柏林在美国内战和普法战争中均...